Everything that makes it into the gift guides for VanMag or our sister magazine, Western Living, has gotten the thumbs up from our editorial team, of course. But when it comes to the editors' own holiday wish lists, what wound up on top? 

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A pair of statement earrings 

My go-to answer for most gift-giving occasions is "I'd love anything from Walrus, please." But if I had to get specific and pinpoint one thing in particular from this carefully curated Cambie Street homewares boutique, it would be a pair of these sweet blown-glass Balancing Act No 2. earrings ($97) by L.A.'s Hyworks. In our Zoom-centric world, tossing on a pair of statement earrings is as close as I'm getting to dressing up: may as well make a splash. —Stacey McLachlan, editor at large

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A Pyjama Powersuit

When we all transitioned to working from home in March, I researched WFH advice to make sure I had all the information I needed to be a productive, responsible remote employee. Some consistent don’ts: Don’t work from your bed. Don’t work in your pajamas. Don’t skip your regular morning routine. I read the warnings, I considered them, and I ignored them. Don’t let anyone tell you you can’t open your eyes and your email at the same time. I’m doing what works for ME, okay?

That said, there’s some work etiquette you can’t avoid, like looking somewhat presentable for Zoom meetings. So I’ve got this pyjama powersuit on my wish list: it’s meeting-friendly, comfy, and the print is goddamn adorable. The pj/suit hybrid ($73 for the top and $73 for the bottom) is a collab between Smash + Tess and the The Birds Papaya. I really feel like it will make me a better worker. And sleeper.—Alyssa Hirose, assistant editor

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A Cool Candleholder

A friend recently organized a Zoom dinner party, where we were asked to dress up, and either cook or order a takeout meal that included an appetizer, main and dessert—and tablecloths and candlelight was encouraged. I managed to hit most of the requested details (Chambar being my takeout of choice), but realized I was sorely lacking in anything candle-related that wasn't heavily scented for a home spa day (perfect for 2020, less for eating moules frites). And so I've got my eye on these pretty things. Laven is a new local industrial design studio that recently launched this line of candleholders with design shop Provide (from $95). They're made from locally sourced white oak, and the whitewashed stain brings the lightness to home that I'm really, really seeking out these days. —Anicka Quin, editorial director

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A Multi-use Wonder from Canada Goose

I've been working on a post featuring 5 absolutely classic made-in-Canada gifts (BTW—not as easy as it sounds for garments) and one of the choices is a home-grown parka from Canada Goose. Bur while I was scanning the website, I came across this little number and it immediately shot to the top of my Christmas list. It's technically called The Hybridge Knit Reversible Hoodie, but for me it's called the perfect coat for Vancouver, given that it can be worn in that 0-5C that marks huge swaths of our winter without looking like a slob. For starters, it's—as advertised—reversible, so you can mentally cut the price ($795) in half because you're getting two different coats. It also solves the problem of wanting the benefits of a vest without having to actually wear one (I'm not really a vest guy) as it's got these cool knit arms. Really, when you come down to it, not only is it 2 coats, but it also takes the place of a puffy vest and a nice sweater combo. We're now up to it being the equivalent of 4 garments! It's practically buying itself.—Neal McLennan, Food Editor

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East Van Lightweight Sweatshirt

I got this for Christmas a few years ago. It quickly became one of my go-to sweaters. It fit perfectly, was super comfortable and pissed off many of my "raised-on-the-westside" friends. Was I being sort of a poser about it, since I was also raised on the westside? Sure. But I have lived on the east side for many years now (until very recently I lived two minutes away from the sign on the shirt), and think I've earned the right to wear the shirt. Plus, whenever I'm anywhere else (remember travel?) the sweater gets a bunch of shoutouts. 

There was even that one time outside a bar in Ottawa where a guy told my friend and I that he was also from Vancouver only to reveal—after some pointed questioning—that he was actually from Surrey. The sweater continued to look good, Surrey dude did not. 

Unfortunately, between a couple of moves it was lost in the shuffle. I miss it dearly, though because I also feel like I have more than enough clothes and still think it's gotta be around here somewhere, I refuse to spend the $40 to get another one. But hey, if I get it for Christmas? Nothing to feel guilty about there.—Nathan Caddell, associate editor